Advertisement

Psychotherapy with Men

  • Matt Englar-Carlson
  • Mark A. Stevens
  • Robert Scholz
Chapter

Abstract

Evidence-based practice has become the key focus of evaluation for clinical work. Within the field of psychology there is no consensus on what constitutes good evidence for a practice (Norcross, Beutler, & Levant, 2006).

Keywords

Gender Role Therapeutic Alliance Role Conflict Hegemonic Masculinity Couple Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Ackerman, S. J., & Hilsenroth, M. J. (2003). A review of therapist characteristics and techniques positively impacting the therapeutic alliance. Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1–33.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Addis, M. E. (2008). Gender and depression in men. Clinical Psychology, 15, 153–168.Google Scholar
  3. Addis, M. E., & Cohane, G. H. (2005). Social scientific paradigms of masculinity and their implications for research and practice in men’s mental health. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 6, 633–647.Google Scholar
  4. Addis, M. E., & Mahalik, J. R. (2003). Men, masculinity, and the contexts of help-seeking. American Psychologist, 58, 5–14.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. American Psychological Association (APA). (2003). Guidelines on multicultural education, training, research, practice, and organizational change for psychologists. American Psychologist, 58, 377–402.Google Scholar
  6. American Psychological Association (APA). (2007). Guidelines for psychological practice with girls and women. American Psychologist, 62, 949–979.Google Scholar
  7. American Psychological Association (APA) Presidential Task Force on Evidence-based Practice. (2006). Evidence-based practice in psychology. American Psychologist, 61, 271–285.Google Scholar
  8. American Psychological Association Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. (1995). Training in and dissemination of empirically-validated psychological treatment: Report and recommendations. Clinical Psychologist, 48, 2–23.Google Scholar
  9. Anderson, R. N., Kochanek, K. D., & Murphy, S. L. (1997). Report of final mortality statistics, 1995. Monthly Vital Statistics Report, 45(Suppl. 2).Google Scholar
  10. Andrews, G., Issakidis, C., & Carter, G. (2001). Shortfall in mental health service utilisation. British Journal of Psychiatry, 179, 417–425.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Antshel, K. M. (2002). Integrating culture as a means of improving treatment adherence in the Latino population. Psychology, Health, and Medicine, 7, 435–449.Google Scholar
  12. Arciniega, G. M., Anderson, C. M., Tovar-Blank, Z. G., & Tracey, T. J. (2008). Toward a fuller conception of machismo: Development of a Traditional Machismo and Caballerismo Scale. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55, 19–33.Google Scholar
  13. Arias, E., Anderson, R. N., Kung, H. C., Murphy, S. L., & Kochanek, K. D. (2003). Deaths: Final data for 2001. National Vital Statistics Reports, 52(3), 30–33.Google Scholar
  14. Atkinson, D. R., Bui, U., & Mori, S. (2001). Multiculturally sensitive empirically supported treatments: An oxymoron? In J. G. Ponterotto, J. M. Casas, L. A. Suzuki, & C. M. Alexander (Eds.), Handbook of multicultural counseling (2nd ed., pp. 542–574). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  15. Baker, D., & King, S. E. (2004). Child sexual abuse and incest. In R. T. Francoeur & R. J. Noonan (Eds.), International encyclopedia of sexuality (pp. 1233–1237). New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
  16. Bernal, G., & Scharrón-del-Río, M. R. (2001). Are empirically supported treatments valid for ethnic minorities? Toward an alternative approach for treatment research. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 7, 328–342.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Bernard, J. (1981). The good-provider role: Its rise and fall. American Psychologist, 36, 1–12.Google Scholar
  18. Blazina, C. (1997). Mythos and men: Toward new paradigms of masculinity. Journal of Men’s Studies, 5, 285–294.Google Scholar
  19. Blazina, C., Eddins, R., Burridge, A., & Settle, A. G. (2007). The relationship between masculinity ideology, loneliness, and separation-individuation difficulties. Journal of Men’s Studies, 15, 101–109.Google Scholar
  20. Blazina, C., & Marks, L. I. (2001). College men’s affective reactions to individual therapy, psychoeducational workshops, and men’s support group brochures: The influence of gender-role conflict and power dynamics upon help-seeking attitudes. Psychotherapy, 38, 297–305.Google Scholar
  21. Boysen, G. A., Vogel, D. L., Madon, S., & Wester, S. R. (2006). Mental health stereotypes about gay men. Sex Roles, 54, 69–82.Google Scholar
  22. Brannon, R. (1976). The male sex-role: Our culture’s blueprint of manhood and what it’s done for us lately. In D. S. Brannon & R. Brannon (Eds.), The forty-nine percent majority (pp. 1–45). Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  23. Brooks, G. R. (1998). A new psychotherapy for traditional men. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  24. Brooks, G. R., & Good, G. E. (Eds.). (2005). The new handbook of psychotherapy & counseling with men: A comprehensive guide to settings, problems, & treatment approaches (Rev. ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  25. Brown, L. S. (2006). Still subversive after all these years: The relevance of feminist therapy in the age of evidence-based practice. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 30, 15–24.Google Scholar
  26. Brown, L. S. (2010). Feminist therapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  27. Bruch, M. A. (1978). Holland’s typology applied to client-counselor interaction: Implications for counseling men. Counseling Psychologist, 7, 26–32.Google Scholar
  28. Burke, B. L., Arkowitz, H., & Dunn, C. (2001). The efficacy of motivational interviewing and its adaptations: What we know so far. In W. Miller & S. Rollnick (Eds.), Motivational interviewing (2nd ed., pp. 217–250). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  29. Cabe, N. (1999). Abused boys and adolescents: Out of the shadows. In A. M. Horne & M. S. Kiselica (Eds.), Handbook of counseling boys and adolescent males: A practitioner’s guide (pp. 199–218). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  30. Cabrera, N. J., Tamis-LeMonda, C. S., Bradley, R. H., Hofferth, S., & Lamb, M. E. (2000). Fatherhood in the twenty-first century. Child Development, 71, 127–136PubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. Caldwell, L. D., & White, J. L. (2001). African-centered therapeutic and counseling interventions for African American males. In G. R. Brooks & G. E. Good (Eds.), The handbook of counseling and psychotherapy approaches for men (pp. 737–753). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  32. Casas, J. M., Turner, J. A., & Ruiz de Esparza, C. A. (2001). Machismo revisited in a time of crisis: Implications for understanding and counseling Hispanic men. In G. Brooks & G. Good (Eds.), The handbook of counseling and psychotherapy approaches for men (pp. 754–779). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  33. Chambless, D. C., & Ollendick, T. H. (2001). Empirically supported psychological interventions: Controversies and evidence. Annual Review of Psychology, 52, 685–716.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Chambless, D. C., Sanderson, W. C., Shoham, V., Johnson, S. B., Pope, K. S., Crits-Christoph, P., et al. (1996). An update on empirically validated therapies. Clinical Psychologist, 49, 5–18.Google Scholar
  35. Chang, T., & Subramaniam, P. R. (2008). Asian and Pacific Islander American men’s help-seeking: Cultural values and beliefs, gender roles, and racial stereotypes. International Journal of Men’s Health, 7, 121–136.Google Scholar
  36. Chin, J. L. (2005). The psychology of prejudice and discrimination: Bias based on gender and sexual orientation (Vol. 3). Westport, CT: Praeger.Google Scholar
  37. Cochran, S. D., & Mays, V. M. (2000). Lifetime prevalence of suicide symptoms and affective disorders among men reporting same-sex sexual partners: Results from NHANES III. American Journal of Public Health, 90, 573–578PubMedGoogle Scholar
  38. Cochran, S. V. (2005). Assessing and treating depression in men. In G. Brooks & G. Good (Eds.), The new handbook of psychotherapy and counseling with men (pp. 121–133). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  39. Cochran, S. V., & Rabinowitz, F. E. (1996). Men, loss, and psychotherapy. Psychotherapy, 33, 593–600.Google Scholar
  40. Cochran, S. V., & Rabinowitz, F. E. (2000). Men and depression: Clinical and empirical perspectives. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  41. Commonwealth Fund. (1998). Women’s and men’s health survey, 1998. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  42. Connell, R. W., & Messerschmidt, J. W. (2005). Hegemonic masculinity: Rethinking the concept. Gender & Society, 19, 829–859.Google Scholar
  43. Courtenay, W. H. (1998). College men’s health: An overview and a call to action. Journal of American College Health, 46, 279–290.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  44. Courtenay, W. H. (2000). Engendering health: A social constructionist examination of men’s health beliefs and behaviors. Psychology of Men & Masculinity. 1, 4–15.Google Scholar
  45. Cusack, J., Deane, F. P., Wilson, C. J., & Ciarrochi, J. (2004). Who influences men to go to therapy? Reports from men attending psychological services. International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 26, 271–283.Google Scholar
  46. Cusak, J., Deane, F. P., Wilson, C. J., & Ciarrochi, J. (2006). Emotional expression, perceptions of therapy, and help-seeking intentions in men attending therapy services. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 7, 69–82.Google Scholar
  47. D’Arcy, C., & Schmitz, J. A. (1979). Sex differences in the utilization of health services for psychiatric problems in Saskatchewan. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 24, 19–27.Google Scholar
  48. Davis, K., Evans, M., & Lorber, J. (2006). Handbook of gender and women’s studies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  49. Doss, B. D., & Hopkins, J. R. (1998). The Multicultural Masculine Ideology Scale: Validation from three cultural perspectives. Sex Roles, 38, 719–741.Google Scholar
  50. Doucet, A. (2004). “It’s almost like I have a job, but I don’t get paid”: Fathers at home reconfiguring work, care, and masculinity. Fathering, 2, 277–302.Google Scholar
  51. Englar-Carlson, M. (2006). Masculine norms and the therapy process. In M. Englar-Carlson & M. A. Stevens (Eds.), In the therapy room with men: A casebook about psychotherapeutic process and change with male clients (pp. 13–48). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  52. Englar-Carlson, M., & Shepard, D. S. (2005). Engaging men in couples counseling: Strategies for overcoming ambivalence and inexpressiveness. Family Journal, 13, 383–391.Google Scholar
  53. Englar-Carlson, M., Smart, R., Arczynski, A., Boucher, M., & Shepard, D. (2008, August). The process of male sensitive psychotherapy: Qualitative analysis of cases. Poster presentation at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Boston, MA.Google Scholar
  54. Englar-Carlson, M., & Stevens, M. A. (Eds.). (2006). In the room with men: A casebook of therapeutic change. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  55. Fischer, A. R., & Good, G. E. (1997). Men and psychotherapy: An investigation of alexithymia, intimacy, and masculine gender roles. Psychotherapy, 34, 160–170.Google Scholar
  56. Franklin, A. J. (1998). Treating anger in African-American men. In W. Pollack & R. Levant (Eds.), New psychotherapy for men (pp. 239–258). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  57. Galdas, P. M., Cheater, F., & Marshall, P. (2005). Men and health help-seeking behaviour: Literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 49, 616–623.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  58. Gartner, R. B. (1999). Betrayed as boys: Psychodynamic treatment of sexually abused men. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  59. Gibbons, J. L., Hamby, B. A., & Dennis, W. D. (1997). Researching gender-role ideologies internationally and cross-culturally. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 21, 151–170.Google Scholar
  60. Gibbons, M. B. C., Crits-Christoph, P., de la Cruz, C., Barber, J. P., Siqueland, L., & Gladis, M. (2003). Pretreatment expectations, interpersonal functioning, and symptoms in the prediction of the therapeutic alliance across supportive-expressive psychotherapy and cognitive therapy. Psychotherapy Research, 1, 59–76.Google Scholar
  61. Gillon, E. (2008). Men, masculinity and person-centered therapy. Person-Centered and Experiential Psychotherapies, 7, 120–134.Google Scholar
  62. Gilman, S. E., Cochran, S. D., Mays, V. M., Hughes, M., Ostrow, D., & Kessler, R. C. (2001). Risks of psychiatric disorders among individuals reporting same-sex sexual partners in the National Comorbidity Survey. American Journal of Public Health, 91, 933–939PubMedGoogle Scholar
  63. Good, G. E. (1998). Missing and underrepresented aspects of men’s lives. SPSMM Bulletin, 3(2), 1–2.Google Scholar
  64. Good, G. E., Gilbert, L. A., & Scher, M. (1990). Gender aware therapy: A synthesis of feminist therapy and knowledge about gender. Journal of Counseling and Development, 68, 376–380.Google Scholar
  65. Good, G. E., Heppner, P. P., DeBord, K. A., & Fischer, A. R. (2004). Understanding men’s psychological distress: Contributions of problem solving appraisal and masculine role conflict. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 5, 168–177.Google Scholar
  66. Good, G. E., & Mintz, L. B. (2001). Integrative psychotherapy for men. In G. R. Brooks & G. E. Good (Eds.), The handbook of counseling and psychotherapy approaches for men (pp. 582–602). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  67. Good, G. E., & Sherrod, N. (1997). Men’s resolution of non-relational sex across the lifespan. In R. Levant & G. R. Brooks (Eds.), Men and sex: New psychological perspectives (pp. 182–204). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  68. Good, G. E., & Sherrod, N. (2001). The psychology of men and masculinity: Research status and future directions. In R. Unger (Ed.), Handbook of the psychology of women and gender. (pp. 201–214). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  69. Good, G. E., Thomson, D. A., & Brathwaite, A. (2005). Men and therapy: Critical concepts, theoretical frameworks, and research recommendations. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 6, 699–711.Google Scholar
  70. Good, G. E., & Wood, P. K. (1995). Male gender role conflict, depression, and help seeking: Do college men face double jeopardy? Journal of Counseling and Development, 74, 70–75.Google Scholar
  71. Greif, G. L. (2008). Buddy system: Understanding male friendships. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  72. Haldeman, D. C. (2001). Psychotherapy with gay and bisexual men. In G. R. Brooks & G. E. Good (Eds.), The handbook of counseling and psychotherapy approaches for men (pp. 796–815). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  73. Haldeman, D. C. (2006). Queer eye on the straight guy: A case of gay male heterophobia. In M. Englar-Carlson & M. A. Stevens (Eds.), In the room with men: A casebook of therapeutic change (pp. 301–318). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  74. Hammond, W. P., & Mattis, J. S. (2005). Being a man about it: Manhood meaning among African American men. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 6, 114–126.Google Scholar
  75. Hanna, E., & Grant, B. (1997). Gender differences in DSM-IV alcohol use disorders and major depression as distributed in the general population: Clinical implications. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 38, 202–212.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  76. Hayes, J. A., & Gelso, C. J. (2001). Clinical implications of research on countertransference: Science informing practice. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 57, 1041–1051.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  77. Heesacker, M., Wester, S. R., Vogel, D. L., Wentzel, J. T., Mejia-Millan, C. M., & Goodholm, C. R. (1999). Gender-based emotional stereotyping. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 46, 483–495.Google Scholar
  78. Hodgetts, D., & Chamberlain, K. (2002). ‘The problem with men’: Working class men making sense of men’s health on television. Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 269–283.Google Scholar
  79. Holland, J. (1973). Making vocational choices: A theory of careers. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  80. Holmes, W. C., & Slap, G. B. (1998). Sexual abuse of boys: Definition, prevalence, correlates, sequelae, and management. Journal of the American Medical Association, 280, 1855–1862.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  81. Hsiung, R. C. (Ed.). (2002). E-Therapy: Case studies, guiding principles, and the clinical potential of the internet. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  82. Husaini, B. A., Moore, S. T., & Cain, V. A. (1994). Psychiatric symptoms and help seeking behavior among the elderly: An analysis of racial and gender differences. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 21, 77–195.Google Scholar
  83. Iacoviello, B. M., McCarthy, K. S., Barrett, M. S., Rynn, M., Gallop, R., & Barber, J. P. (2007). Treatment preferences affect the therapeutic alliance: Implications for randomized controlled trials. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 75, 194–198.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  84. Imel, Z. E., & Wampold, B. E. (2008). The common factors of psychotherapy. In S. D. Brown & R. W. Lent (Eds.), Handbook of counseling psychology (4th ed., pp. 249–268). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  85. Jansz, J. (2000). Masculine identity and restrictive emotionality. In A. H. Fischer (Ed.), Gender and emotion: Social psychological perspectives (pp. 166–186). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  86. Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2006). Monitoring the future – National survey results on drug use, 1975–2005: Volume 1, Secondary school students [NIH Publication No. 06-5883]. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse.Google Scholar
  87. Jordan, J. (2010). Relational-cultural theory. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  88. Kennedy, G., Metz, H., & Lowinger, R. (1995). Epidemiology and inferences regarding the etiology of late life suicide. In G. Kennedy (Ed.), Suicide and depression in late life (pp. 3–22). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  89. Kessler, R. C., McGonagle, K. A., Zhao, S., Nelson, C. B., Hughes, M., Eshelman, S., et al. (1994). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of DSM–III–R psychiatric disorders in the United States: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey. Archives of General Psychiatry, 51, 8–19.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  90. Kilmartin, C. T. (2007). The masculine self (3rd ed.). Cornwall-on-Hudson, NY: Sloan.Google Scholar
  91. Kimmel, M. (2005). Manhood in America: A cultural history (2nd ed.). New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  92. Kimmel, M., & Messner, M. (Eds.). (2004). Men’s lives (6th ed.). New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  93. Kiselica, M. S. (2001). A male-friendly therapeutic process with school-age boys. In G. R. Brooks & G. E. Good (Eds.), The new handbook of psychotherapy and counseling with men (Vol. 1, pp. 41–58). San Francisco, CA: Joseey-Bass.Google Scholar
  94. Kiselica, M. S. (2003). Transforming psychotherapy in order to succeed with boys: Male-friendly practices. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 59, 1225–1236.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  95. Kiselica, M. S. (2006, August). Contributions and limitations of the deficit model of men. In M. S. Kiselica (Chair), Toward a positive psychology of boys, men, and masculinity. Symposium presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  96. Kiselica, M. S., & Englar-Carlson, M. (2008). Establishing rapport with boys in individual counseling. In M. S. Kiselica, M. Englar-Carlson, & A. Horne (Eds.), Counseling troubled boys: A guidebook for professionals (pp. 49–65). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  97. Kiselica, M. S., Englar-Carlson, M., & Fisher, M. (2006, August). A positive psychology framework for building upon male strengths. In M. S. Kiselica (Chair), Toward a positive psychology of boys, men, and masculinity. Symposium presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  98. Kiselica, M. S., Englar-Carlson, M., & Horne, A. (2008). A positive psychology perspective on helping boys. In M. S. Kiselica, M. Englar-Carlson, & A. Horne (Eds.), Counseling troubled boys: A guidebook for professionals (pp. 31–48). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  99. Kiselica, M. S., & Woodford, M. S. (2007). Promoting healthy male development: A social justice perspective. In C. Lee (Ed.), Counseling for social justice (pp. 111–135). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.Google Scholar
  100. Knox, R. (2008). Clients’ experiences of relational depth in client-centered therapy. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research, 8, 182–188.Google Scholar
  101. Leong, F. T. L., & Zachar, P. (1999). Gender and opinions about mental illness as predictors of attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 27, 123–132.Google Scholar
  102. Levant, R. F. (1990). Introduction to special series on men’s roles and psychotherapy. Psychotherapy, 27, 307–308.Google Scholar
  103. Levant, R. F. (1997). The masculinity crisis. Journal of Men’s Studies, 5, 221–231.Google Scholar
  104. Levant, R. F., & Pollack, W. S. (Eds.). (1995). The new psychology of men. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  105. Levant, R. F., Richmond, K., Majors, R. G., Inclan, J. E., Rossello, J. M., Heesacker, M., et al. (2003). A multicultural investigation of masculinity ideology and alexithymia. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 4, 91–99.Google Scholar
  106. Levant, R. F., & Silverstein, L. S. (2005). Gender is neglected in both evidence-based practices and “treatment as usual.” In J. C. Norcross, L. E. Beutler, & R. F. Levant (Eds.), Evidence-based practice in mental health: Debate and dialogue on the fundamental questions (pp. 338–345). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  107. Lisak, D. (1994). The psychological consequences of childhood abuse: Content analysis of interviews with male survivors. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 7, 525–548.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  108. Lisak, D. (2001). Male survivors of trauma. In G. R. Brooks & G. E. Good (Eds.), The new handbook of psychotherapy and counseling with men (pp. 263–277). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  109. Liu, W. M. (2005). The study of men and masculinity as an important multicultural competency consideration. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 6, 685–697.Google Scholar
  110. Liu, W. M. (2002a). Exploring the lives of Asian American men: Racial identity, male role norms, gender role conflict, and prejudicial attitudes. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 3, 107–118.Google Scholar
  111. Liu, W. M. (2002b). The social class-related experiences of men: Integrating theory and practice. Professional Psychology, 33, 355–360.Google Scholar
  112. Liu, W. M., & Chang, T. (2007). Asian American masculinities. In F. T. L. Leong, A. Ebero, L. Kinoshita, A. G. Arpana, & L. H. Yang (Eds.), Handbook of Asian American psychology (2nd ed., pp. 197–211). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  113. Majors, R. G., & Billson, J. M. (1992). Cool pose: The dilemmas of Black manhood in America. New York: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  114. Mahalik, J. R. (2001a). Cognitive therapy for men. In G. R. Brooks & G. E. Good (Eds.), The handbook of counseling and psychotherapy approaches for men (pp. 544–564). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-BassGoogle Scholar
  115. Mahalik, J. R. (2001b). Interpersonal therapy for men. In G. Brooks & G. Good (Eds.), The handbook of counseling and psychotherapy approaches for men (pp. 565–581). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  116. Mahalik, J. R., Good, G. E., & Englar-Carlson, M. (2003). Masculinity scripts, presenting concerns, and help-seeking: Implications for practice and training. Professional Psychology, 34, 123–131.Google Scholar
  117. Magovcevic, M., & Addis, M. E. (2005). Linking gender role conflict to non-normative and self-stigmatizing perceptions of alcohol abuse and depression. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 6, 127–136.Google Scholar
  118. Manthei, R. J. (2007). Clients talk about their experience of the process of counselling. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 20, 1–26.Google Scholar
  119. Martin, S. B., Wrisberg, C. A., Beitel, P. A., & Lounsbury, J. (1997). NCAA Division I athletes’ attitudes toward seeking sport psychology consultation: The development of an objective instrument. Sport Counselor, 11, 201–218.Google Scholar
  120. McKelley, R. A. (2007). Men’s resistance to seeking help: Using individual psychology to understand counseling-reluctant men. Journal of Individual Psychology, 63, 48–58.Google Scholar
  121. McKelley, R. A., & Rochlen, A. B. (2007). The practice of coaching: Exploring alternatives to therapy for counseling-resistant men. Psychology of Men & Masculinity 8, 53–65.Google Scholar
  122. Mellinger, T., & Liu, W. M. (2006). Men’s issues in doctoral training: A survey of counseling psychology programs. Professional Psychology, 37, 196–204.Google Scholar
  123. Messer, S. B., & Wampold, E. B. (2002). Let’s face the facts: Common factors are more potent than specific therapy ingredients. Clinical Psychology, 9, 21–25.Google Scholar
  124. Millar, A. (2003). Men’s experience of considering counseling: “Entering the Unknown.” Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 3, 16–24.Google Scholar
  125. Miller, W. R., Rollnick, S., & Conforti, K. (2002). Motivational interviewing: Preparing people for change (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  126. Möller-Leimkuehler, A. (2002). Barriers to help-seeking in men: A review of the socio-cultural and clinical literature with particular reference to depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 71, 1–9.Google Scholar
  127. Moos, R. (2007). Theory-based active ingredients of effective treatments for substance use disorders. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 88, 109–121.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  128. National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). (2003). Real men. Real depression. Retrieved October 20, 2008, from http://menanddepression.nimh.nih.gov
  129. Neighbors, H., & Howard, C. (1987). Sex differences in professional help seeking among adult Black Americans. American Journal of Community Psychology, 15, 403–417.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  130. Neighbors, H. W., Musick, M. A., & Williams, D. R. (1998). The African American minister as a source of help for serious personal crises: Bridge or barrier to mental health care. Health Education & Behavior, 26, 759–777.Google Scholar
  131. Norcross, J. C. (2001). Purposes, processes, and products of the Task Force on Empirically Supported Therapy Relationships. Psychotherapy, 38, 345–356.Google Scholar
  132. Norcross, J. C., Beutler, L. E., & Levant, R. F. (2006). Evidence-based practices in mental health: Debate and dialogue on the fundamental questions. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  133. Norcross, J. C., & Lambert, M. J. (2005). The therapy relationship. In J. C. Norcross, L. E. Beutler, & R. F. Levant (Eds.), Evidence-based practices in mental health: Debate and dialogue on the fundamental questions (pp. 208–218). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  134. Nylund, D. (2007). Beer, babes, and balls: Masculinity and sports talk radio. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
  135. O’Brien, R., Hunt, K., & Hart, G. (2005). It’s caveman stuff, but that is to a certain extent how guys still operate: Men’s accounts of masculinity and help seeking. Social Science & Medicine, 61, 503–516.Google Scholar
  136. O’Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men’s gender role transitions over the lifespan: Transformations and fears of femininity. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 14, 305–324.Google Scholar
  137. Oquendo, M. A., Ellis, S. P., Greenwald, S., Malone, K. M., Weissman, M. M., & Mann, J. J. (2001). Ethnic and sex differences in suicide rates relative to major depression in the United States. American Journal of Psychiatry, 158, 1652–1658.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  138. Paniagua, F. A. (2005). Assessing and treating culturally diverse clients: A practical guide (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  139. Park, S. (2006). Facing fear without losing face: Working with Asian American men. In M. Englar-Carlson & M. A. Stevens (Eds.), In the room with men: A casebook of therapeutic change (pp. 151–173). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  140. Pascoe, C. J. (2003). Multiple masculinities? Teenage boys talk about jocks and gender. American Behavioral Scientist, 46, 1423–1438.Google Scholar
  141. Pederson, E., & Vogel, D. (2007). Male gender role conflict and willingness to seek counseling: Testing a mediation model on college-aged men. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 54, 373–384.Google Scholar
  142. Plummer, D. C. (2001). The quest for modern manhood: Masculine stereotypes, peer culture, and the social significance of homophobia. Journal of Adolescence, 24, 15–23.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  143. Pollack, W. S. (1995). No man is an island: Toward a new psychoanalytic psychology of men. In R. F. Levant & W. S. Pollack (Eds.), A new psychology of men (pp. 33–67). New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  144. Pollack, W. S. (1998). Mourning, melancholia, and masculinity: Recognizing and treating depression in men. In W. S. Pollack & R. F. Levant (Eds.), New psychotherapy for men (pp. 147–166). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
  145. Pollack, W. S., & Levant, R. F. (1998). New psychotherapy for men. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  146. Rabinowitz, F. E., & Cochran, S. V. (2002). Deepening psychotherapy with men. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  147. Real, T. (1997). I don’t want to talk about it: Overcoming the secret legacy of male depression. New York: Fireside.Google Scholar
  148. Real, T. (2002). How can I get through to you? Reconnecting men and women. New York: Scribner.Google Scholar
  149. Robertson, J. M., & Fitzgerald, L. F. (1990). The (mis)treatment of men: Effects of client gender role and life-style on diagnosis and attribution of pathology. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 37, 3–9.Google Scholar
  150. Robertson, J. M., & Fitzgerald, L. F. (1992). Overcoming the masculine mystique: Preferences for alternative forms of assistance among men who avoid counseling. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 39, 240–246.Google Scholar
  151. Robertson, J. M., & Shepard, D. S. (2008). The psychological development of boys. In M. Kiselica, M. Englar-Carlson, & A. Horne (Eds.), Counseling troubled boys (pp. 3–30). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  152. Rochlen, A. B., & Hoyer, W. D. (2005). Marketing mental health to men: Theoretical and practical considerations. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67, 675–684.Google Scholar
  153. Rochlen, A. B., McKelley, R. A., & Pituch, K. A. (2006). A preliminary exploration of the “Real Men. Real Depression” campaign. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 7, 1–13.Google Scholar
  154. Rochlen, A. B., & O’Brien, K. M. (2002). The relation of male gender role conflict and attitudes toward career counseling to interest and preferences for different career counseling styles. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 3, 9–21.Google Scholar
  155. Rosenbaum, A., & Leisring, P. A. (2003). Beyond power and control: Toward an understanding of partner abusive men. Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 34, 7–22.Google Scholar
  156. Sachs-Ericsson, N., & Ciarlo, J. A. (2000). Gender, social roles, and mental health: An epidemiological perspective. Sex Roles, 43, 605–628.Google Scholar
  157. Sandfort, T. G. M., de Graaf, R., Bijl, R. V., & Schnabel, P. (2001). Same-sex sexual behavior and psychiatric disorders: Findings from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS). Archives of General Psychiatry, 58, 85–91.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  158. Sandman, D., Simantov, E., & An, C. (2000). Out of touch: American men and the health care system. New York: Commonwealth Fund.Google Scholar
  159. Scher, M. (2001). Male therapist, male client: Reflections on critical dynamics. In G. R. Brooks & G. E. Good (Eds.), The handbook of counseling and psychotherapy approaches for men (pp. 719–733). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  160. Scher, M., Stevens, M. A., Good, G. E., & Eichenfield, E. (1987). Handbook of psychotherapy with men. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  161. Seligman, M., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology: An introduction. American Psychologist, 55, 5–14.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  162. Shepard, D. S. (2005). Male development and the journey toward disconnection. In D. Comstock (Ed.), Diversity and development: Critical contexts that shape our lives and relationships (pp. 133–160). Belmont, CA: Brooks-Cole.Google Scholar
  163. Sheu, H. B., & Sedlacek, W. E. (2004). An exploratory study of help-seeking attitudes and coping strategies among college students by race and gender. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, 37, 130–143.Google Scholar
  164. Shin, J. K. (2002). Help-seeking behaviors by Korean immigrants for depression. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 23, 461–476.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  165. Solberg, V. S., Ritsma, S., Davis, B. J., Tata, S. P., & Jolly, A. (1994). Asian-American Students’ severity of problems and willingness to seek help from university counseling centers: Role of previous counseling experience, gender, and ethnicity. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 41, 215–219.Google Scholar
  166. Smiler, A. P. (2004). Thirty years after the discovery of gender: Psychological concepts and measures of masculinity. Sex Roles, 50, 15–26.Google Scholar
  167. Stevens, M. A. (2009). Cultural-social-psychological model of men’s socialization and clinical issues. Unpublished manuscript. California State University, Northridge, CA.Google Scholar
  168. Stevens, M.A. (2006, August). Engaging men in psychotherapy: Respect and challenge. In M. S. Kiselica (Chair), Toward a positive psychology of boys, men, and masculinity. Symposium presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  169. Stricker, G. (2010). Integrative psychotherapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  170. Sue, D. W., Arredondo, P., & McDavis, R. (1992). Multicultural counseling competencies and standards: A call to the profession. Journal of Counseling and Development, 70, 477–484.Google Scholar
  171. Sue, D., Capodilupo, C., & Holder, A. (2008). Racial microaggressions in the life experience of Black Americans. Professional Psychology, 39, 329–336.Google Scholar
  172. Sue, D., Capodilupo, C., Torino, G., Bucceri, J., Holder, A., Nadal, K., et al. (2007). Racial microaggressions in everyday life: Implications for clinical practice. American Psychologist, 62, 271–286.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  173. Sue, D. S., & Sue, D. (2008). Counseling the culturally diverse: Theory and practice (5th ed.). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  174. Tager, D., & Good, G. E. (2005). Italian and American masculinities: A comparison of masculine gender role norms. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 6, 264–274.Google Scholar
  175. Timlin-Scalera, R. M., Ponterotto, J. G., Blumberg, F. C., & Jackson, M. A. (2003). A grounded theory study of help-seeking behaviors among White male high school students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 50, 339–350.Google Scholar
  176. U.S. Department of Justice. (2003). Criminal victimization in the United States, 2002 statistical tables. Retrieved on October 24, 2008, from http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/cvus0202.pdf.
  177. Van Wuk, C. M. T. G., Kolk, A. M., Van Den Bosch, W. J. H. M., & Van Den Hoogen, H. J. M. (1992). Male and female morbidity in general practice: The nature of sex differences. Social Science and Medicine, 35, 665–678.Google Scholar
  178. Vessey, J. T., & Howard, K. I. (1993). Who seeks psychotherapy? Psychotherapy, 30, 546–553.Google Scholar
  179. Vogel, D. L., Epting, F., & Wester, S. R. (2003). Counselors’ perceptions of female and male clients. Journal of Counseling and Development, 81, 131–141.Google Scholar
  180. Vogel, D., Gentile, D., & Kaplan, S. (2008). The influence of television on willingness to seek therapy. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64, 276–295PubMedGoogle Scholar
  181. Vogel, D. L., Wade, N. G., & Haake, S. (2006). Measuring the self-stigma associated with seeking psychological help. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 53, 325–337.Google Scholar
  182. Vogel, D. L., Wade, N. G., Wester, S., Larson, L., & Hackler, A. H. (2007). Seeking help from a mental health professional: The influence of one’s social network. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 63, 233–245.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  183. Vogel, D. L., & Wester, S. R. (2003). To seek help or not to seek help: The risks of self-disclosure. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 50, 351–361.Google Scholar
  184. Vogel, D. L., Wester, S. R., & Larson, L. M. (2007). Avoidance of counseling: Psychological factors that inhibit seeking help. Journal of Counseling and Development, 85, 410–422.Google Scholar
  185. Walker, L. E. A. (2001). A feminist perspective on men in emotional pain. In G. Brooks & G. Good (Eds.), The handbook of counseling and psychotherapy approaches for men (pp. 683–695). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  186. Wampold, B. E. (2001). The great psychotherapy debate: Models, methods, and findings. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  187. Wampold, B. E. (2010). The basics of psychotherapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  188. Ward, T., Hogan, K., Stuart, V., & Singleton, E. (2008). The experiences of counselling for persons with ME. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 8, 73–79.Google Scholar
  189. Weeks, R., & Widon, C. S. (1998). Self-reports of early childhood victimization among incarcerated adult male felons. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 13, 346–361.Google Scholar
  190. Westen, D., & Morrison, K. (2001). A multidimensional meta-analysis of treatments for depression, panic, and generalized anxiety disorders: An examination of the status of empirically supported therapies. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 69, 875–899.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  191. Wester, S., & Lyubelsky, J. (2005). Supporting the thin blue line: Gender-sensitive therapy with male police officers. Professional Psychology, 36(1), 51–58.Google Scholar
  192. Wester, S. R., Vogel, D. L., Pressly, P. K., & Heesacker, M. (2002). Sex differences in emotion: A critical review of the literature and implications for counseling psychology. Counseling Psychologist, 30, 629–651.Google Scholar
  193. Whaley, A. L., & Davis, K. E. (2007). Cultural competence and evidence-based practice: A complementary perspective. American Psychologist, 62, 563–574.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  194. Wong, Y. J. (2006). Strength-centered therapy: A social constructionist, virtues-based psychotherapy. Psychotherapy, 43, 133–146.Google Scholar
  195. Wong, Y. J., Pituch, K. A., & Rochlen, A. B. (2006). Men’s restrictive emotionality: An investigation of associations with other emotion-related constructs, anxiety, and underlying dimensions. Psychology of Men & Masculinity, 7, 113–126.Google Scholar
  196. Zane, N., & Yeh, M. (2002). The use of culturally-based variables in assessment: Studies on loss of face. In K. S. Kurasaki & S. Okazaki (Eds.), Asian American mental health: Assessment theories and methods (pp. 123–138). New York: Kluwer/Plenum.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matt Englar-Carlson
    • 1
  • Mark A. Stevens
    • 1
  • Robert Scholz
    • 2
  1. 1.California State UniversityFullertonUSA
  2. 2.Pepperdine UniversityMalibuUSA

Personalised recommendations