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Artificial Consciousness

  • Antonio Chella
  • Riccardo Manzotti
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive and Neural Systems book series (SSCNS)

Abstract

“Artificial” or “machine” consciousness is the attempt to model and implement aspects of human cognition that are identified with the elusive and controversial phenomenon of consciousness. The chapter reviews the main trends and goals of artificial consciousness research, as environmental coupling, autonomy and resilience, phenomenal experience, semantics or intentionality of the first and second type, information integration, attention. The chapter also proposes a design for a general “consciousness oriented” architecture that addresses many of the discussed research goals. Comparisons with competing approaches are then presented.

Keywords

Artificial Agent Information Integration Conscious Experience Relevant Signal Phenomenal Consciousness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer EngineeringUniversity of PalermoPalermoItaly

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