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Air Sparging for the Treatment of Chlorinated Solvent Plumes

  • Paul C. Johnson
  • Richard L. Johnson
  • Cristin L. Bruce
Chapter
Part of the SERDP/ESTCP Environmental Remediation Technology book series (SERDP/ESTCP)

Abstract

In its simplest form, in situ air sparging (IAS) is a source zone and dissolved groundwater plume remediation technology that involves injection of air into an aquifer through a collection of vertical wells screened below the water table. Modifications to this basic design may include the use of horizontal wells placed below the water table, vertical wells placed in an engineered trench, the delivery of gaseous reactants (hydrogen, propane, oxygen, etc.), the use of vapor recovery and treatment systems, pulsing of the gas injection and heating of the injection gas. The basic process components of IAS systems are shown in Figure 14.1.

Keywords

Injection Well Source Zone Soil Vapor Extraction Groundwater Quality Monitoring Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul C. Johnson
    • 1
  • Richard L. Johnson
    • 2
  • Cristin L. Bruce
    • 3
  1. 1.Arizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Oregon Health & Science UniversityBeavertonCanada
  3. 3.Shell Global SolutionsHoustonUSA

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