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Profiling MicroRNAs Differentially Expressed in Rabbit Retina

  • Naihong Yan
  • Ke Ma
  • Jia Ma
  • Wei Chen
  • Yun Wang
  • Guiqun Cao
  • Dominic Man-Kit Lam
  • Xuyang Liu
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 664)

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, which regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs may constitute a major mechanism underlying mammal’s retinal development. The overall objective of this study is to compare and contrast retinal miRNAs expression between newborn and adult rabbits, and to identify some of the genes possibly associated with retinal development. Retinas were isolated from 3-day-old and 2-month-old rabbits. A miRNA microarray designed to detect 924 miRNAs was used to determine the expression profile of miRNAs from newborn and adult rabbits. The expression of twenty-eight miRNAs was found to differ significantly between newborn and adult rabbit retina. Among these, 17 appear to be up-regulated and the other 11 miRNAs down-regulated, suggesting a role of differential miRNA expression in retinal development. Computer prediction tools indicate that some of the target genes might be directly associated with signal pathways relevant to visual development.

Keywords

miRNA Expression miRNA Expression Profile Retinal Tissue Adult Rabbit miRNA Microarray 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naihong Yan
    • 1
  • Ke Ma
    • 1
  • Jia Ma
    • 1
  • Wei Chen
    • 1
  • Yun Wang
    • 1
  • Guiqun Cao
    • 1
  • Dominic Man-Kit Lam
    • 2
  • Xuyang Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Torsten Wiesel Research Institute and Department of OphthalmologyWest China Hospital, Sichuan UniversityChengduChina
  2. 2.World Eye OrganizationHong kongChina

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