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The Role of Technology in the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Setting

  • Betsy K. Davis
  • Randy Emert
Chapter
Part of the Biological and Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering book series (BIOMEDICAL)

Abstract

Medical imaging and rapid prototyping are viable tools which can be utilized in the process of creating extraoral prostheses. Successful implementation is a direct result of close collaboration between medical and engineering personnel. The use of medical imaging and rapid prototyping has the potential to reduce the cost and time in the fabrication of the wax patterns and could result in a more accurate morphologic result. This chapter describes the use of medical imaging and rapid prototyping used in the fabrication of an auricular wax pattern and its adaption to the clinical defect. The use of this technology results in a more symmetrical wax pattern and a significant time saving compared to sculpting in the traditional manner.

Keywords

Rapid Prototype Selective Laser Sinter Prosthetic Reconstruction Craniofacial Malformation Nasal Defect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departments of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery and Oral & Maxillofacial SurgeryMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  2. 2.Engineering Graphics, Clemson UniversityClemsonUSA

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