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Neuropsychological Assessment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

  • Jennifer J. Vasterling
  • Laura Grande
  • Anna C. Graefe
  • Julie A. Alvarez
Chapter

Abstract

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder that sometimes develops after exposure to a life-threatening, psychologically traumatic event. Reflecting empirical advances relevant to the neurobiology and cognitive neuroscience of PTSD, this chapter will focus on PTSD as a neurobehavioral syndrome. We begin by describing PTSD, including a brief review of its clinical presentation and underlying neuropathology. We next review the neurocognitive characteristics of the disorder, common neuropsychological approaches to its assessment, and key clinical considerations in conducting neuropsychological evaluations when PTSD is a possible diagnosis. The chapter additionally addresses treatment implications, concluding with family and social considerations.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Ptsd Symptom Attentional Bias Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Autobiographical Memory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer J. Vasterling
    • 1
    • 2
  • Laura Grande
    • 3
    • 2
  • Anna C. Graefe
    • 4
  • Julie A. Alvarez
    • 5
  1. 1.Psychology Service and VA National Center for PTSDVA Boston Healthcare SystemBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  3. 3.Psychology ServiceVA Boston Healthcare SystemBostonUSA
  4. 4.Research ServiceVA Boston Healthcare SystemBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA

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