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Genetic Syndromes Associated with Intellectual Disabilities

  • Leonard Abbeduto
  • Andrea McDuffie
Chapter

Abstract

Intellectual disability, formerly referred to as mental retardation, is defined by significant limitations in cognitive functioning and the ability to adapt to the demands of daily life and an onset before the age of 18 years [1].

Keywords

Down Syndrome Intellectual Disability Williams Syndrome Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule Full Mutation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Preparation of this chapter was supported by NIH grants R01 HD024356, R01 HD054764, and P30 HD003352.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology, Waisman CenterUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Waisman CenterUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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