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Interviewing Strategies, Rapport, and Empathy

  • Catherine Miller
Chapter

Abstract

The two main tasks of a clinician are to accurately assess client symptoms and then to effectively treat these symptoms. What ties these two tasks together is the clinical diagnosis. Diagnosis has been defined as the “identification and labeling of a psychiatric disorder by examination and analysis” (Segal, Maxfield, & Coolidge, 2008, p. 371). It is essential that clinicians arrive at a reliable and valid diagnosis to successfully treat the disorder and ameliorate client distress. In order to do this, clinicians must be able to effectively interview clients. Effective interviewing involves both technical knowledge, such as what subject areas to cover, and interpersonal skills, such as the ability to create rapport and respond empathically with clients. This chapter will address both areas. Technical knowledge will be addressed by reviewing the main diagnostic interviewing strategies that have been utilized in the field, whereas interpersonal skills will be addressed by reviewing the extant literature on empathy and rapport.

Keywords

Structure Interview Diagnostic Interview Interpersonal Skill Interview Format Semistructured Interview 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Professional Psychology, HPC/Pacific UniversityHillsboroUSA

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