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ESSENCE

  • Hsinchun Chen
  • Daniel Zeng
  • Ping Yan
Part of the Integrated Series in Information Systems book series (ISIS, volume 21)

Abstract

The Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics (ESSENCE) was developed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) in collaboration with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the District of Columbia Department of Health, and the Virginia Department of Health under the sponsorship of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). It is now used in the Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections System (DoD-GEIS). It is currently deployed in the National Capital Area (NCA) (Lombardo et al., 2004). The system monitors both military and civilian healthcare data daily for early outbreak detection and warning, fusing information from multiple data sources that vary in their medical specificity, spatial organization, scale, and time-series behavior (Burkom et al., 2004). ESSENCE has gone through a series of important development stages, and its most current prototype is ESSENCE IV.

Figure 10-1 shows the system architecture of ESSENCE. It collects public health status information from three major channels: clinical data, nonclinical syndromic data, and health events-related information. The accessibility of the collected information is managed by either disclosure control or sharing polices to ensure the privacy of personal healthcare information. Automated outbreak detection and alerting are supported. Situation and threat awareness and epidemiology investigation support are integrated with secured Web-based visualization and user interfaces.

Keywords

Exponentially Weight Move Average Multiple Data Source Defense Advance Research Project Agency Defense Advance Research Project Agency Outbreak Detection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Important readings:

  1. 1.
    Lombardo, J., H. Burkom, et al. (2003). “A systems overview of the Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics (ESSENCE II).” Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 80(2): pp 32–42.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Burkom, H., E. Elbert, et al. (2004). “Role of Data Aggregation in Biosurveillance Detection Strategies with Applications from ESSENCE.” MMWR (CDC) 53(Suppl): pp 67–73.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lombardo, J., H. Burkom, et al. (2004). “Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics (ESSENCE II), Framework for Evaluating Syndromic Surveillance Systems.” Syndromic surveillance: report from a national conference, 2003. MMWR 2004 53(Suppl): pp 159–165.Google Scholar

References

  1. Burkom, H., Elbert, E., Feldman, A., and Lin, J. 2004. "Role of Data Aggregation in Biosurveillance Detection Strategies with Applications from Essence," MMWR (CDC) (53(Suppl)), pp. 67–73.Google Scholar
  2. Lombardo, J., Burkom, H., and Pavlin, J. 2004. "Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-Based Epidemics (ESSENCE II), Framework for Evaluating Syndromic Surveillance Systems," Syndromic surveillance: report from a national conference, 2003. MMWR 2004 (53(Suppl)), pp. 159–165.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hsinchun Chen
    • 1
  • Daniel Zeng
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ping Yan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Management Information SystemsEller College of Management University of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Management Information SystemsEller College of Management University of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  3. 3.Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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