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Implications for Translational Prevention Research: Science, Policy, and Advocacy

  • Anthony Biglan
  • Diana H. Fishbein
Chapter

Abstract

This volume presents the most recent findings regarding underlying mechanisms in inhibitory control, documents its central role in the onset and continuation of drug abuse, and discusses the approaches that apply basic science knowledge to practice. The current evidence fits well with the nascent movement to improve the conditions that harm child development and to provide a physical and social environment that fosters optimal functioning in our children and families. When conditions and teachings are conducive to developing selfregulation over inhibitions, young people are more likely to cooperate with others, exhibit prosocial behaviors and attitudes, delay gratification, learn from prosocial role models, and engage in adaptive decisionmaking. On the other hand, children who are exposed to circumstances, conditions, and experiences that are suboptimal or frankly deleterious, they are often directed toward a trajectory characterized by poor inhibitory control and, in turn, high-risk behaviors, such as drug misuse.

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Inhibitory Control Tobacco Control Nurture Environment Provide Drug Abuse Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Oregon Research InstituteEugeneUSA

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