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Introduction

  • Benjamin Gidron
  • Michal Bar
Chapter
Part of the Nonprofit and Civil Society Studies book series (NCSS)

In the last three decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth, worldwide, of the third sector in size and importance. This growth created a situation in most countries, whereby existing government policies toward the Third Sector did no longer fit the new reality. The process of fitting the modes of relations between government and the Third Sector to the new reality is a complex one as it has to deal with a variety of fragmentations: Different fields of practice, different levels of government, and different types of Third Sector organizations – engaged in service provision, advocacy, and funding (foundations).

The need for a new policy (or change of existing policies) toward the Sector prompted efforts and initiatives in some countries (for example: the UK, Canada, Hungary, India, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, and Israel) in the past decade to deal with the situation; it is expected that other countries will follow suit. A review of such cases suggests that it is dealt with by...

Keywords

Policy Process Policy Initiative Business Sector Sector Organization Civil Society Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Israeli Center for Third Sector ResearchBen Gurion University of the NegevBeer-shevaIsrael
  2. 2.Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social WelfareHebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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