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Diet-Induced Ketosis Improves Cognitive Performance in Aged Rats

  • Kui Xu
  • Xiaoyan Sun
  • Bernadette O. Eroku
  • Constantinos P. Tsipis
  • Michelle A. Puchowicz
  • Joseph C. LaManna
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

Aging is associated with increased susceptibility to hypoxic/ischemic insult and declines in behavioral function which may be due to attenuated adaptive/defense responses. We investigated if diet-induced ketosis would improve behavioral performance in the aged rats. Fischer 344 rats (3- and 22-month-old) were fed standard (STD) or ketogenic (KG) diet for 3 weeks and then exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. Cognitive function was measured using the T-maze and object recognition tests. Motor function was measured using the inclined-screen test. Results showed that KG diet significantly increased blood ketone levels in both young and old rats. In the aged rats, the KG diet improved cognitive performance under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; while motor performance remained unchanged. Capillary density and HIF-1α levels were elevated in the aged ketotic group independent of hypoxic challenge. These data suggest that diet-induced ketosis may be beneficial in the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions.

Keywords

Normoxic Condition Capillary Density Hypoxic Exposure Object Exploration Object Recognition Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kui Xu
    • 1
  • Xiaoyan Sun
    • 1
  • Bernadette O. Eroku
    • 1
  • Constantinos P. Tsipis
    • 1
  • Michelle A. Puchowicz
    • 1
  • Joseph C. LaManna
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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