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Macrophages That Survive Hyperoxia Exposure Have Higher Superoxide Dismutase Activities in Their Mitochondria

  • Kenichi Kokubo
  • Saki Soeda
  • Toshihiro Shinbo
  • Minoru Hirose
  • Noriyuki Fuku
  • Yutaka Nishigaki
  • Masashi Tanaka
  • Hirosuke Kobayashi
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

Prolonged exposure to hyperoxia, which is routinely used in patients with severe respiratory failure, leads to the generation of excessive reactive oxygen species, resulting in lung injury. In the present study, we focused on macrophages and their survival, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in mitochondria (Mn-SOD activity), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation after exposure to hyperoxia. Macrophages were cultured under two different conditions: normoxia and intermittent hyperoxia. The number of cells exposed to intermittent hyperoxia for 3 weeks significantly decreased, compared with the number of cells exposed to normoxia. The Mn-SOD activity of the cells that survived intermittent hyperoxia exposure was significantly higher than that of the cells exposed to normoxia. Direct sequencing and a PCR-RFLP assay did not provide any evidence of mutation in the cells that survived intermittent hyperoxia exposure. In conclusion, an increase in the antioxidative activity of mitochondria is important for the survival of macrophages exposed to hyperoxia, and the increased activity level possibly enhances protective effects against mtDNA mutations in surviving cells.

Keywords

Severe Respiratory Failure Hyperoxia Exposure Daiichi Pure Chemical Human Monocyte Cell Line Heteroplasmic Site 
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Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Research Project (No. 2007-1009) from Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences to H. K.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenichi Kokubo
    • 1
  • Saki Soeda
    • 1
  • Toshihiro Shinbo
    • 1
  • Minoru Hirose
    • 1
  • Noriyuki Fuku
    • 2
  • Yutaka Nishigaki
    • 2
  • Masashi Tanaka
    • 2
  • Hirosuke Kobayashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Engineering and TechnologySchool of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato UniversityKanagawaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Genomics for Longevity and HealthTokyo Metropolitan Institute of GerontologyTokyoJapan

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