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Bedside Assessment of Cerebral Vasospasms After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage by Near Infrared Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

  • Noriaki Yokose
  • Kaoru Sakatani
  • Yoshihiro Murata
  • Takashi Awano
  • Takahiro Igarashi
  • Sin Nakamura
  • Tatsuya Hoshino
  • Tsuneo Kano
  • Atsuo Yoshino
  • Yoichi Katayama
  • Etsuko Ohmae
  • Toshihiko Suzuki
  • Motoki Oda
  • Yutaka Yamashita
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

We examined the usefulness of near infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS) for detection of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We investigated seven aneurysmal SAH patients with poor clinical conditions (WFNS grade V) who underwent endovascular coil embolization. Employing TRS, we measured the oxygen saturation (SO2) and baseline hemoglobin concentrations in the cortices. Measurements of TRS and transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) were performed repeatedly for 14 days after SAH. In four of the seven patients, the SO2 and hemoglobin concentrations measured in the brain tissue of the middle cerebral artery territory remained stable after SAH. However, in three patients, TRS revealed abrupt decreases in SO2 and total hemoglobin between 5 and 9 days after SAH. Cerebral angiography performed on the same day revealed severe vasospasms in these patients. Although TCD detected the vasospasm in two of three cases, it failed to do so in one case. TRS could detect vasospasms after SAH by evaluating the cortical blood oxygenation.

Keywords

Blood Flow Velocity Contribution Ratio Transcranial Doppler Sonography Poor Clinical Condition Severe Vasospasm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noriaki Yokose
    • 1
  • Kaoru Sakatani
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yoshihiro Murata
    • 4
  • Takashi Awano
    • 5
  • Takahiro Igarashi
    • 6
  • Sin Nakamura
    • 7
  • Tatsuya Hoshino
    • 1
  • Tsuneo Kano
    • 5
  • Atsuo Yoshino
    • 1
  • Yoichi Katayama
    • 6
    • 3
  • Etsuko Ohmae
    • 8
  • Toshihiko Suzuki
    • 8
  • Motoki Oda
    • 8
    • 9
  • Yutaka Yamashita
    • 9
  1. 1.Division of Neurological Surgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Optical Brain Engineering, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Division of Applied System Neuroscience, Department of Advanced Medical ScienceNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Care of SpringerCare of SpringerCare of Springer
  6. 6.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  7. 7.Department of NeurosurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  8. 8.Central Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.ShizuokaJapan
  9. 9.Central Laboratory, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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