Unchanged Muscle Deoxygenation Heterogeneity During Bicycle Exercise After 6 Weeks of Endurance Training

  • Ryotaro Kime
  • Masatsugu Niwayama
  • Masako Fujioka
  • Kiyoshi Shiroishi
  • Takuya Osawa
  • Kousuke Shimomura
  • Takuya Osada
  • Norio Murase
  • Toshihito Katsumura
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) level and its heterogeneity after 6 weeks of endurance training using multi-channel near infrared spatially resolved spectroscopy (NIRSRS). Nine healthy subjects participated in this study (Male = 6, Female = 3, age: 27 ± 5 years, height: 168.7 ± 7.4 cm, weight: 62.4 ± 12.4 kg). The subjects performed a 30 W ramp incremental bicycle exercise test until exhaustion before and after endurance training. The NIRSRS probe was attached to the left vastus lateralis muscle along the direction of the long axis. The subjects performed bicycle exercise for 30 min/day, 3 days/week for 6 weeks. The work rate during training was set at \(60\% \dot {\rm V}{\rm O}_{2{\rm{peak}}}\) and increased every \(5\% \dot {\rm V}{\rm O}_{2{\rm{peak}}}\) when the subjects could maintain the work rate three times consecutively. After training,  .VO2peak was significantly increased (Pre: 42.7 ± 9.9 ml/kg/min, Post: 52.3 ± 7.2 ml/kg/min, p < 0.001) and the mean SmO2 within measurement sites at \(\dot {\rm V}{\rm O}_{2{\rm{peak}}}\) was significantly decreased (Pre: 56.1 ± 1.1 %, Post: 53.3 ± 2.2 %, p < 0.05). Conversely, the heterogeneity of the SmO2 during exercise was not changed by training. These results suggest that the functional heterogeneity of O2 balance did not change due to endurance training, and the O2 balance heterogeneity may not interfere with O2 exchange in the activating muscle in healthy individuals.

Keywords

Dioxide Attenuation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful for revision of this manuscript by Christa Colletti. We also thank Mikiko Yonemitsu and Ayaka Sato for their helpful technical assistance. This study was supported in part by Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists from the Japan Society for Promotion of Science 18700536 to R. K.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryotaro Kime
    • 1
  • Masatsugu Niwayama
    • 2
  • Masako Fujioka
    • 1
  • Kiyoshi Shiroishi
    • 3
    • 1
  • Takuya Osawa
    • 1
  • Kousuke Shimomura
    • 1
  • Takuya Osada
    • 1
  • Norio Murase
    • 1
  • Toshihito Katsumura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sports Medicine for Health Promotion, Faculty of MedicineTokyo Medical UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringShizuoka UniversityShizuokaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Judotherapy and Sports Medicine, Faculty of Health ScienceRyotokuji UniversityChibaJapan

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