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Comparison of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials and Cerebral Blood Oxygenation Changes in the Sensorimotor Cortex During Activation in the Rat

  • Yuko Kondo
  • Kaoru Sakatani
  • Takahiro Igarashi
  • Tatsuya Hoshino
  • Yoshihiro Murata
  • Emiri Tejima
  • Tsuneo Kano
  • Yoichi Katayama
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

The relationship between changes in cerebral blood oxygenation and neuronal activity remains to be fully established. We compared somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and evoked cerebral blood oxygenation (CBO) changes in the sensorimotor cortex of the rat. In rats anesthetized with urethane and alpha-chloralose, we measured SEP and CBO using visible light spectroscopy (VLS) during neuronal activity. Increase of stimulus frequency caused a decrease of SEP amplitude, but an increase in concentration changes of deoxy-Hb and oxygen satu-ration. The difference in frequency responses between SEP and CBO might be caused by activation of inhibitory neurons, which could suppress excitatory neu-rons at high stimulus frequencies; activation of inhibitory neurons could reduce SEP amplitude, and increase oxygen saturation due to an increase of evoked cere-bral blood flow.

Keywords

Oxygen Saturation Sensorimotor Cortex Stimulus Frequency Inhibitory Neuron Somatosensory Evoke Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuko Kondo
    • 1
  • Kaoru Sakatani
    • 2
  • Takahiro Igarashi
    • 3
  • Tatsuya Hoshino
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Murata
    • 3
  • Emiri Tejima
    • 1
  • Tsuneo Kano
    • 3
  • Yoichi Katayama
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Neurological Surgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Optical Brain Engineering, Department of Neurological Surgery; Division of Applied System Neuroscience, Department of Advanced Medical ScienceNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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