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The Partial Coherence Method for Assessment of Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation using Near-infrared Spectroscopy: Potential and Limitations

  • D. De Smet
  • J. Jacobs
  • L. Ameye
  • J. Vanderhaegen
  • G. Naulaers
  • P. Lemmers
  • F. van Bel
  • M. Wolf
  • S. Van Huffel
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

The most important forms of brain injury in premature infants are partly caused by disturbances in cerebral autoregulation. As changes in cerebral intravascular oxygenation (HbD), regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2), and cerebral tissue oxygenation (TOI) reflect changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), impaired autoregulation can be measured by studying the concordance between HbD/rSO2/TOI and the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), assuming no changes in oxygen consumption, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), and in blood volume. We investigated the performance of the partial coherence (PCOH) method, and compared it with the coherence method (COH). The PCOH method allows the elimination of the influence of SaO2 on HbD/rSO2/TOI in a linear way. We started from long-term recordings measured in the first days of life simultaneously in 30 infants from three medical centres. We then compared the COH and PCOH results with patient clinical characteristics and outcomes, and concluded that PCOH might be a better method for assessing impaired autoregulation.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Mean Arterial Blood Pressure Poor Clinical Outcome Cerebral Oxygenation Cerebral Autoregulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research was supported by: Research Council KUL: GOA AMBioRICS, CoE EF/05/006, by FWO projects G.0519.06 (Non-invasive brain oxygenation), and G.0341.07 (Data fusion), by Belgian Federal Science Policy Office IUAP P5/22.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. De Smet
    • 1
  • J. Jacobs
    • 1
  • L. Ameye
    • 1
  • J. Vanderhaegen
    • 2
  • G. Naulaers
    • 2
  • P. Lemmers
    • 3
  • F. van Bel
    • 3
  • M. Wolf
    • 4
  • S. Van Huffel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), SCD DivisionKatholieke Universiteit LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Department of NeonatologyUniversity Hospital Gasthuisberg, Katholieke Universiteit LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  3. 3.Department of NeonatologyWilhelmina Children’s HospitalUtrechtNetherlands
  4. 4.Clinic of NeonatologyUniversity Hospital ZurichZurichSwitzerland

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