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Effect of Transient Forebrain Ischemia on Flavoprotein Autofluorescence and the Somatosensory Evoked Potential in the Rat

  • Takahiro Igarashi
  • Kaoru Sakatani
  • Tatsuya Hoshino
  • Norio Fujiwara
  • Yoshihiro Murata
  • Tsuneo Kano
  • Jun Kojima
  • Takamitsu Yamamoto
  • Yoichi Katayama
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 662)

Abstract

In order to evaluate the effect of cerebral ischemia on the flavoprotein fluorescence (FPF), we compared the changes in the FPF and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) during transient cerebral ischemia in the rat. We measured the FPF and SEP simultaneously via a cranial window made over the right sensorimotor cortex during the left median nerve stimulation in F344 rats. We compared change in FPF and SEP during cerebral ischemia for 60 min. The rCBF were rapidly recovered after reperfusion. However, the recovery rates of the FPF were significantly faster than those of the SEP after reperfusion. These findings indicate that activity-dependent changes of the FPF do not necessarily correlate with the electrical activity after transient cerebral ischemia.

Keywords

Sensorimotor Cortex Somatosensory Evoke Potential Transient Cerebral Ischemia Transient Forebrain Ischemia Bilateral Common Carotid Artery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takahiro Igarashi
    • 1
  • Kaoru Sakatani
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tatsuya Hoshino
    • 4
  • Norio Fujiwara
    • 5
  • Yoshihiro Murata
    • 6
  • Tsuneo Kano
    • 1
  • Jun Kojima
    • 1
  • Takamitsu Yamamoto
    • 3
    • 4
  • Yoichi Katayama
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Optical Brain Engineering, Department of Neurological SurgeryTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Division of Applied System Neuroscience, Department of Advanced Medical ScienceNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Division of Neurological Surgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  6. 6.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan

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