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Measuring Colors

  • Georg Klein
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Optical Sciences book series (SSOS, volume 154)

Abstract

At the beginning of the previous chapter, empirical color value systems suitable for numerical quantification of color impressions were described. A fundamental requirement for such systems is an accurate and precise measurement of the spectral reflectance or transmittance of the relevant color patterns. This necessity comes down to the fact that the retinal color stimulus is caused by the spectral reflection or transmission of the colored object, among other things. Accordingly, the measuring result should agree with the visual impression as well as possible. Color measuring instruments have been established and used since about 1960. Today, they are indispensable pieces of equipment for industrial color physics. Color measuring and especially the clear interpretation of the results require extensive knowledge and experience with regard to the underlying visual, color physical, and metrological interrelations

Keywords

Color Difference Color Pattern Specular Reflection Color Match Measuring Geometry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georg Klein
    • 1
  1. 1.HerrenbergGermany

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