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Introduction

  • Dan Zhang
Chapter

Abstract

The demands for higher performance of general-purpose industrial robots are increasing continuously. In particular, the need for truly adaptive automation in many applications has led to higher requirements for operational accuracy, load capacity, task flexibility, reliability, and cycle time with robots. Examples of such needs are higher precision assembly, faster product handling, better measurements, surface finishing, and milling capabilities. Furthermore, there is a high demand for off-line programming to eliminate touch-up of programmed positions; in other words, robots must perform their task with better load capacity and accuracy in operations. A general trend of meeting these demands and requirements is to make use of parallel robots, which have excellent potential capabilities, including high rigidity, high accuracy, and high loading capacities.

Parallel robots generally comprise two platforms, which are connected by at least two kinematic chains, and to provide relative motion between a moveable platform and a base platform. In fact, parallel robots have become an indispensable part of general robots both in industry and in academia. Besides, with the rapid development of parallel robots a few decades ago, the research on mechanism theory, mobility analysis, dimensional synthesis, kinematics and dynamics modeling, and design optimization have been increasing in a large scale.

Keywords

Machine Tool Parallel Mechanism Kinematic Chain Parallel Robot Swiss Federal Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering and Applied ScienceUniversity of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT)OshawaCanada

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