United Nations Counterterrorist Strategies and Human Rights

Chapter

Abstract

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, elicited a variety of responses from states, international organizations, and regional actors. Very early on, and with the certainty of a U.S. response in mind, there was a lot of discussion concerning the role of the United Nations (UN) in the emerging global antiterrorist campaign. Some analysts felt that irrespective of the nature of the appropriate response (i.e., whether the emphasis would be on law enforcement initiatives or military action), this was a campaign for which the UN was, by its very nature, mandate, and modus operandi, not “well equipped to be involved in.”

Keywords

Europe Expense Egypt Defend International Atomic Energy Agency 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceJohn Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, CUNYNew YorkUSA

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