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Manuals for Practitioners

  • T. Mark Harwood
  • Luciano L’Abate
Chapter

Abstract

The application of randomized clinical trial (RCT) research to psychotherapy, involving head-to-head comparisons of treatments for specified conditions, led to a proliferation of published and empirically supported treatment manuals. The large-scale NIMH Treatment of Depression Collaborative Treatment Program (TCRCP; Elkin et al., 1989) introduced the methodological innovation of treatment manuals as a way to make treatment comparisons (Beutler, Clarkin, & Bongar, 2000; Beutler et al., 2004; Lambert & Ogles, 2004). Manualized treatments are tools that investigators may utilize to aid in the identification of the signal or active ingredients within treatments and separate these specific treatment elements from the general therapeutic qualities of the therapists delivering the treatment. Unfortunately, the relatively small cadre of therapists used in the TCRCP did not allow investigators to confidently disentangle therapist effects from treatment effects.

Keywords

Generalize Anxiety Disorder Treatment Manual Bulimia Nervosa Coping Style Dialectical Behavior Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Mark Harwood
    • 1
  • Luciano L’Abate
    • 2
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentWheaton CollegeWheatonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyGeorgia State UniversityAtlantaUSA

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