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Interaction and Exchange Across the Transition to Pastoralism, Lake Turkana, Kenya

  • Emmanuel Ndiema
  • Carolyn D. Dillian
  • David R. Braun
Chapter

Abstract

Artifacts from the Galana Boi Formation in Kenya present a rare view of the dynamics of ancient lifestyles. Archeological materials include evidence of hunter-gatherer and fishing economies, and the beginnings of the earliest pastoralism in Kenya. Through the use of X-ray fluorescence analysis for sourcing of obsidian artifacts, we present theories of social networks, mobility, and exchange that may ultimately shed light on the nature of pastoralism’s introduction to East Africa.

Keywords

Lake Level Optically Stimulate Luminescence Laser Ablation Inductively Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry Subsistence Strategy Lake Level Fluctuation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Professor John W. K. (Jack) Harris for all his assistance and support during the completion of this project. We would also like to acknowledge the Koobi Fora Field School, Rutgers University, the National Museums of Kenya, Professor M. Steven Shackley, and the Archaeological XRF Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley. Funding was provided by the William Hallum Tuck Fund, Princeton University.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emmanuel Ndiema
    • 1
  • Carolyn D. Dillian
    • 2
  • David R. Braun
    • 3
  1. 1.Rutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA
  2. 2.Princeton UniversityPrincetonUSA
  3. 3.University of Cape TownCape TownSouth Africa

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