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Global Warming pp 307-313 | Cite as

CO2 Absorption in a Mini-module Membrane Contactor

  • G. Pantoleontos
  • S. P. Kaldis
  • D. Koutsonikolas
  • P. Grammelis
  • G. P. Sakellaropoulos
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

Undesirable species such as CO2 which is usually encountered in a coal upgrading process product gas is considered to be one of the major contributors to the global warming problem via the greenhouse effect. In fact, half of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions are produced by fossil fuels in industry and power plants (Desideri and Paolucci, 1999). Unless major policy changes and technological innovations take place, future concentrations of CO2 will continue to increase largely, mainly as a result of fossil fuel uses in transport, heating, and power generation (Wuebbles and Jain, 2001). Therefore, reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions has become an international priority, requiring the introduction of efficient and flexible technologies, capable of operating over a wide range of concentration levels and volumetric flows.

Keywords

Membrane Module Liquid Flow Rate Shell Side Membrane Contactor Gear Pump 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The experimental data were obtained within the framework of the European program HYDROSEP (contract RFCR-CT-2006-00003) and was partly funded by the European Commission. Liqui-cel web site is http://www.liqui-cel.com (Accessed on April 2008).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Pantoleontos
    • 1
  • S. P. Kaldis
    • 1
  • D. Koutsonikolas
    • 2
  • P. Grammelis
    • 1
  • G. P. Sakellaropoulos
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Research and Technology HellasTHERMI-THESSALONIKIGreece
  2. 2.Aristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece

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