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Appendix: Methodology

  • Jyoti Belur
Chapter

Abstract

The research began in 2001, the year in which police encounters peaked in Mumbai, and police use of deadly force was in the forefront of media reports. Although encounters were not a new phenomenon in Mumbai, there was no deep examination into the issues involved in either police or public circles. This research attempts to do just that, drawing on the accounts of some of the actors involved in ­encounters, those bystanders to them and those who influenced the social processes that ­contributed to making encounters both acceptable and desirable.

Keywords

Police Officer Deadly Force Indian Police Core Term Police Encounter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jill Dando Institute of Crime ScienceUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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