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Explaining Encounters: What Can We Do About Them?

  • Jyoti Belur
Chapter

Abstract

The final chapter uses “their” (interviewees’) reasons to extrapolate “the” (structural) reasons for why encounters happen (Cohen, States of denial: knowing about atrocities and suffering, p. 58, 2001), why they are tolerated; and identifies agendas for future research. Taking a step back from these stories “the” reasons why police actions were not challenged, and the wider structural and systemic factors that create conditions where killing “hardened” criminals seems to be the last resort for the police are explored. This chapter examines the social and political situation in a commercial, crime-ridden city, preoccupied with protecting its businesses, manufacturing units, and service industry as well as safeguarding the life and property of its citizens and speculates on the wider cultural and specifically police sub-cultural factors that made encounters both feasible and acceptable. Factors accounting for police abuse of force in Mumbai are compared and contrasted with prevailing conditions in other societies where police executions feature prominently. The experience of different police forces and policy makers in other countries have sought to control police use of deadly force by introducing legal, procedural, cultural, and/or structural changes and their efficacy are discussed. Finally, suggestions for possible solutions to curb Mumbai police’s excessive use of deadly force and protect the right to life are offered.

Keywords

Police Officer Criminal Justice System Crime Control Organise Crime Police Organisation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jill Dando Institute of Crime ScienceUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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