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Integrated Contextual Approaches to Understanding Past Activities Using Plant and Animal Remains from Kala Uyuni, Lake Titicaca, Bolivia

  • Katherine Moore
  • Maria Bruno
  • José M. Capriles
  • Christine Hastorf
Chapter

Abstract

For pragmatic reasons, separate specialists usually analyze plant and animal remains recovered in archeological sites. Animal bones and charred plant remains are the products of very different organisms and tissues, fragment differently, and are identified using very different characters (see Peres, this volume; Wright, this volume). Even so, a primary concern of the Taraco Archaeological Project (TAP) has been to integrate these archaeobiological datasets to better understand aspects of ancient lifeways in the Lake Titicaca Basin of the Andes.

Keywords

Archeological Record Heavy Fraction Fish Bone Mammal Bone Burned Bone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the IIE Fulbright Program, and the University of California. The authors are grateful for assistance, advice, and cooperation from the entire Taraco Archaeological Project team, especially Lee Steadman, Melissa Goodman-Elgar, William Whitehead, Nicole Anthony, and Alejandra Dominic. At the University of Pennsylvania Museum, the authors received invaluable help from Naomi Miller and Teagan Schweitzer. This chapter is based on a paper presented at the 71st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Juan Puerto Rico, April 29, 2006; presented as part of the Symposium “Quantitative Integration of Zooarchaeological and Archaeobotanical Data: A Consideration of Methods and Case Studies,” organized by Tanya Peres and Amber VanDerwarker.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine Moore
    • 1
  • Maria Bruno
  • José M. Capriles
  • Christine Hastorf
  1. 1.Museum of Archaeology and AnthropologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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