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Neurogenetic Risk Mechanisms of Schizophrenia: An Imaging Genetics Approach

  • Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg
Chapter

Abstract

It is now broadly recognized that schizophrenia is a largely heritable brain disorder in which interactions with the environment also play a prominent role. This means that understanding how these genetic variants work is essential to identifying the pathophysiological mechanisms of schizophrenia, which in turn is the key to finding novel treatments.

Keywords

Prefrontal Cortex Functional Connectivity Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Dopamine Synthesis COMT Genotype 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Central Institute of Mental Health, Zentralinstitut für Seelische GesundheitMannheimGermany

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