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Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: Clinical Manifestations and Management

  • Anathea C. Powell
  • Steven K. Libutti
Chapter
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 153)

Abstract

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-1) is an autosomal dominant syndrome associated with anterior pituitary, parathyroid, and enteropancreatic endocrine tumors as well as other endocrine and nonendocrine tumors [1]. MEN-1 is defined as the presence of two of three main MEN-1-related manifestations, or at least one manifestation plus a first degree relative with at least one MEN-1-related manifestation [1,2]. The estimated prevalence of MEN-1 ranges from 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 100,000 [3], with 43 and 94% penetrance of MEN-1 by ages 20 and 50, respectively [4].

Keywords

Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type Parathyroid Tissue Thymic Carcinoid Antisecretory Therapy Sporadic PHPT 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tumor Angiogenesis SectionSurgery Branch, National Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryDirector, Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cancer Care.BronxUSA

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