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Molecular Pathology of Lung Cancer

  • Luisa M. Solis
  • Ignacio I. Wistuba
Chapter

Abstract

The histological and molecular characterizations of lung tumors are the basis for most lung cancer current treatments. Furthermore, lung cancer molecular changes are being used as molecular targets and predictive biomarkers for patient’s selection for targeted therapy, particularly, for non-small cell lung carcinomas. Lung adenocarcinomas, especially from nonsmoker patients, harbor mutations of EGFR and translocation EML4-ALK genes, which are targetable genetic abnormalities. Invasive SCC frequently has multiple genetic abnormalities, including activation of several oncogenes such as the fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) gene amplification and the discoidin domain-containing receptor-2 (DDR2) gene mutation, which are promising molecular target genes. For small-cell lung carcinoma, the targeted treatment options are limited, and new targeted pathways are being investigated. For the most accurate molecular characterization of lung cancer, it is critical to sample and analyze tumors at each time point of clinical decision-making. New emerging methodologies applied to tissue and cytology specimens have improved significantly the identification of molecular abnormalities in lung cancer tumors and, importantly, are being applied in molecular pathology diagnostic field.

Keywords

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase KRAS Mutation Copy Number Gain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Unit 85The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Pathology and Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Unit 85The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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