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Future Developments and Uses

  • Joseph H. Bouton
Part of the Handbook of Plant Breeding book series (HBPB, volume 5)

Abstract

All impacts to our environment, including agriculture and grassland management, are tied directly or indirectly to world population and its continued growth. It is estimated that it took the world until 1804 to sustain 1 billion people on the planet; then only another century to add 2 billion; then in less than a hundred years over 4 billion more have been added (Anonymous 2009). In 2006, world population was estimated to be increasing by an astonishing 211,000 persons per day and there is no reason to suspect this growth trend has abated.

Keywords

Quantitative Trait Locus Tall Fescue Genomic Selection Marginal Land Forage Crop 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Samuel Roberts Noble FoundationArdmoreUSA

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