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Minor Grass Species

  • Grzegorz Żurek
  • Magdalena Ševčíková
Part of the Handbook of Plant Breeding book series (HBPB, volume 5)

Abstract

Besides the five major grass genera used widely for both agriculture and non-agriculture purposes, there is quite a large group of neglected cool-season minor grass species which enrich the crop spectrum. The term ‘minor grasses’ refers to the degree of attention paid to these species by scientists, plant breeders, germplasm conservationists, and the commercial sector. The mentioned species are also classed as ‘secondary’ in their importance to agriculture (Spedding and Diekmahns 1972). Minor grass species are commonly found in different types of natural, semi-natural, and sown grassland, such as permanent pastures and meadows, lawns in which they are adapted to a wide range of environmental factors. They are often dominant and/or diagnostic species and their names are associated with vegetation units (e.g., Arrhenatherion elatioris, Cynosurion cristati, and Trisetion flavescentis).

Keywords

Forage Grass Canary Grass Smooth Brome Reed Canarygrass Smooth Bromegrass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Grasses, Legumes and Energy Plants, Laboratory of Non-fodder Grasses and Energy Plants adzikówPlant Breeding and Acclimatization InstituteBłoniePoland
  2. 2.OSEVA PRO LtdGrassland Research Station Rožnov – ZubříZubříCzech Republic

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