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Concluding Comments and Future Considerations for Stressful Life Events and Transitions Across the Life Span

  • Thomas W. Miller
Chapter

Abstract

Life itself is a process of beginnings and endings, of transitions and transformations. Within the natural course of life, there are periods when there are multiple transitions, or so it seems and then there are other times when life events move slowly and do not seem to change at all. Within the course of life, many of these transitions are stressful for some and at least require adaptation and adjustment for most. Transitions in the life span are as natural as the changing seasons.

Life transitions are often stressful, because they require shifts and changes in our lives Dohrwend and Dohrwend (1974). Rahe (1989) along with his colleague Holmes led the research on rating the degree of stress related to several life events and transitions. The challenge for any individual involves letting go of the established and the familiar and confronting the change and the new aspects of life. The shifts involve the future and the unexpected aspects of what the future brings with a sense of vulnerability to what is unexpected. Whether it is the economy, a health-related condition, or mass trauma, it requires effective coping skills and adaptation to the change and the conditions associated with it.

Keywords

Stressful Life Generalize Anxiety Disorder Major Depressive Disorder Stressful Life Event Traumatic Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Kentucky, College of MedicineLexingtonUSA

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