In Vivo Left Ventricular Geometry and Boundary Conditions

  • Jonathan F. Wenk
  • Choon-Sik Jhun
  • Zhihong Zhang
  • Kay Sun
  • Mike Burger
  • Dan Einstein
  • Mark Ratcliffe
  • Julius M. Guccione
Chapter

Abstract

The first basic biomechanics modeling step outlined in the introductory chapter is to define the geometric configuration. In Chapters 12 and 14 we demonstrate the application of either simple (i.e., axisymmetric truncated ellipsoid) or complex (i.e., fully 3-D) left ventricular (LV) geometric models or finite element (FE) meshes. This chapter is primarily concerned with an instructive review of the methodology we have used to create both types of FE meshes, which relies on the “parametric” meshing software TrueGrid®. Since TrueGrid is rather expensive, Section 1.6 describes the use of free software executables available from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The second basic biomechanics modeling step (determine mechanical properties) is addressed in the next three chapters. The third and fourth basic biomechanics modeling steps (governing equations and boundary conditions) are discussed briefly at the end of this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan F. Wenk
    • 1
  • Choon-Sik Jhun
    • 1
  • Zhihong Zhang
    • 1
  • Kay Sun
    • 1
  • Mike Burger
    • 2
  • Dan Einstein
    • 3
  • Mark Ratcliffe
    • 1
  • Julius M. Guccione
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity of California at San Francisco and San Francisco VA Medical CenterSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.XYZ Scientific Applications Inc.LivermoreUSA
  3. 3.Biological Monitoring and ModelingPacific Northwest National LaboratoryOlympiaUSA

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