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Fractures and Skeletal Injuries

  • Nancy S. Harper
  • Arne H. Graff
Chapter

Abstract

Theidentification of a skeletal injury may be the first indication of abuse. Estimates of the frequency of fractures in abused children vary from approximately 10% to 50% depending on the population studied, the type of diagnostic imaging used to detect fractures, and the age of the patients seen (Ebbin, Gollub, Stein, & Wilson, 1969; Herndon, 1983; Leventhal, Thomas, Rosenfield, & Markowitz, 1993). Recently, large population-based studies have been used to estimate the incidence of inflicted skeletal trauma. While the majority of fractures are still attributed to falls, child abuse accounts for 12% of fractures in children less than 36 months of age (Leventhal, 2008).

Keywords

Child Abuse Osteogenesis Imperfecta Skull Fracture Copper Deficiency Skeletal Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Additional Recommended Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy S. Harper
    • 1
  • Arne H. Graff
    • 2
  1. 1.CARE (Child Abuse Resource & Evaluation)Driscoll Children’s HospitalCorpus ChristiUSA
  2. 2.Department with MeritCare Health SystemsChild and Adolescent Maltreatment ServicesFargoUSA

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