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Introduction: Child Abuse and Neglect

  • Angelo P. Giardino
  • Michelle A. Lyn
  • Eileen R. Giardino
Chapter

Abstract

Child abuse and neglect, child maltreatment, and child victimization are interchangeable terms that refer to a major public health problem confronting children and families. Abuse manifests when the child or adolescent’s caregiver fails to provide for the youth’s health and well-being either by causing an injury or, as in neglect, by not meeting a basic need. Because of the multifaceted nature of abuse, a comprehensive definition of child abuse and neglect draws upon information from a number of disciplines and a variety of professionals. The phenomenon of child maltreatment has diverse medical, developmental, psychosocial, and legal consequences. Child abuse and neglect, along with its synonyms, describes a wide range of situations. It involves caregiver acts of commission or omission that had or are likely to have injurious effects on the child’s physical, developmental, and psychosocial well-being.

Keywords

Intimate Partner Violence Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Physical Abuse Corporal Punishment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angelo P. Giardino
    • 1
  • Michelle A. Lyn
    • 2
  • Eileen R. Giardino
    • 3
  1. 1.Baylor College of MedicineTexas Children’s Health Plan, Inc.HoustonUSA
  2. 2.Baylor College of Medicine, Children’s Assessment CenterTexas Children’s HospitalHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Acute & Integrative Care, School of Nursing at HoustonUniversity of TexasHoustonUSA

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