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Affect in Legal and Forensic Settings: The Cognitive Benefits of Not Being Too Happy

  • Joseph P. Forgas
Chapter
Part of the Nebraska Symposium on Motivation book series (NSM, volume 56)

Abstract

Imagine the following scenario. It is a cold, rainy day, and as you enter the local news agency to buy a paper, you briefly notice a number of strange items on the checkout counter – a matchbox car, some plastic toy animals, and a few other trinkets, objects that really do not belong in a shop environment. As you leave the store, a young woman approaches you, introduces herself as a psychologist conducting research on memory, and asks you to try to remember as many of the strange objects you have briefly seen in the shop as you can. The question she is interested in is this: Can your slightly negative mood induced by the unpleasant weather improve the accuracy of your eyewitness memory for the objects you saw? More generally, are we better at remembering everyday details when we are in a bad mood, or do people remember more on a bright, sunny day, when they are in a good mood?

Keywords

Negative Affect Affective State Negative Mood Positive Mood Mood Induction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of PsychologyUniversity of New south WalesSydneyAustralia

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