Exogenous Hormones

Chapter

Abstract

Women worldwide have been prescribed medications containing female steroid sex hormones for the past several decades. These medications primarily containing various derivatives of estrogen and/or progesterone have been used for two main purposes, as menopausal hormone therapy (HT) and as contraceptives [primarily in the form of oral contraceptives (OCs)]. Given the central role of hormones in the etiology of breast cancer and the widespread use of these preparations, numerous studies have evaluated the relationship between both HT and various hormonal contraceptives and breast cancer risk. These relationships have been and continue to be of considerable interest to epidemiologists, physicians, and the general population. A summary of this large body of work is provided below including assessments of the impact different types of hormones have on different types of breast cancer.

Keywords

Estrogen Progestin Medroxyprogesterone Levonorgestrel DMPA 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Program in Epidemiology, Division of Public Health SciencesFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA

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