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A Macroevolutionary Perspective on the Archaeological Record of North America

  • James C. Chatters
Chapter

Abstract

The North American archaeological record is everywhere marked by sequences of internally static economic strategies separated by chronologically brief episodes of innovation and emergence of new forms. This chapter develops ideas about the relationships between resource management strategies (RMS), the forces that maintain stasis and permit RMS change at a variety of levels, and the evolutionary independence of RMS and the sub-strategies that compose them. Examples are provided of macroevolutionary change at two levels. At the level of technologies, the markedly different histories of plant-processing technologies in western North America and the expansion of bow-and-arrow technology across the continent are discussed. At the level of the complete RMS, this chapter focuses on the emergence and rapid expansion of the Missippian, an agrarian-based hierarchical system that dominated the Southeast from 950 cal B.P. until European contact.

Keywords

Archaeological Record Resource Management Strategy Organic Fitness Adaptive Peak Projectile Propulsion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • James C. Chatters
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Fresno/Applied Paleoscience, California State UniversityFresnoUSA
  2. 2.Applied Paleoscience, AMEC Earth and Environmental, IncBothellUSA
  3. 3.Department of Earth and Environmental SciencesCalifornia State UniversityFresnoUSA

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