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Cognitive Radio: From Theory to Practical Network Engineering

  • Ekram Hossain
  • Long Le
  • Natasha Devroye
  • Mai Vu
Chapter

Under utilization of radio spectrum in traditional wireless communication systems [30], along with the increasing spectrum demand from emerging wireless applications, is driving the development of new spectrum allocation policies for wireless communications. These new spectrum allocation policies, which will allow unlicensed users (i.e., secondary users) to access the radio spectrum when it is not occupied by licensed users (i.e., primary users) will be exploited by the cognitive radio (CR) technology. Cognitive radio will improve spectrum utilization in wireless communication systems while accommodating the increasing amount of services and applications in wireless networks. A cognitive radio transceiver is able to adapt to the dynamic radio environment and the network parameters to maximize the utilization of the limited radio resources while providing flexibility in wireless access [45].

Keywords

Medium Access Control Primary User Secondary User Medium Access Control Protocol Cognitive Radio Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag US 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ekram Hossain
    • 1
  • Long Le
    • 2
  • Natasha Devroye
    • 3
  • Mai Vu
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  2. 2.Department of Aeronautics and AstronauticsMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  4. 4.Division of Engineering and Applied SciencesHarvard UniversityMontrealCanada

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