The Role of Physical Activity in Cognitive Fitness: A General Guide for Community Programs

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines physical activity in the context of understanding fitness and preparing for activity as well as practical suggestions for motivating, supporting, and encouraging adherence to exercise regimens. For a more comprehensive review of the exercise–cognition connection, the reader is referred to the Chap. 2 by Boot and Blakely (Enhancing Cognitive Fitness in Adults: A guide for use and development of community-based programs, 2011).

Keywords

Obesity Dust Dementia Respiration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Human Performance and Sport SciencesOhio Northern UniversityAdaUSA

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