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Avoiding Treatment Failures in Panic Disorder

  • Heather W. Murray
  • R. Kathryn McHugh
  • Michael W. Otto
Chapter
Part of the Series in Anxiety and Related Disorders book series (SARD)

Abstract

Panic disorder (PD) is characterized by recurrent panic attacks accompanied by worry about future attacks, worry about the consequences of the attacks (e.g., having a heart attack), or substantial behavioral changes in response to the attacks (American Psychiatric Association, 1994).Panic attacks themselves are distinct periods of intense fear accompanied by four or more physical symptoms which begin suddenly and reach a peak of intensity within 10 min.Panic attacks are ubiquitous to a wide range of anxiety disorders, but in PD the focus of the phobic concern is on the anxiety symptoms themselves and the feared consequences of these symptoms

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Personality Disorder Social Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Panic Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heather W. Murray
    • 1
  • R. Kathryn McHugh
    • 1
  • Michael W. Otto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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