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Resolving Treatment Complications Associated with the Presence of Comorbid Personality Disorders

  • Matthew K. Nock
  • Tara L. Deliberto
  • Michael Hollander
Chapter
Part of the Series in Anxiety and Related Disorders book series (SARD)

Abstract

Eva, a 36-year-old Hispanic woman, presented to an outpatient clinic for the treatment of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Eva was referred by her psychoanalyst, whom she had been seeing four times per week for the past two years, because the analysis did not appear to be improving her SAD and he believed cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) may be indicated. During his first meeting with Eva the CBT clinician conducted a structured diagnostic interview for Axis I disorders, which confirmed the presence of SAD as well as comorbid major depressive disorder. No assessment of Axis II disorders was performed given the case was referred as “a pretty straightforward SAD case” and the initial interview did not disconfirm this (nor did it try).

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Personality Disorder Social Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew K. Nock
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tara L. Deliberto
    • 2
  • Michael Hollander
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  3. 3.Two Brattle CenterCambridgeUSA

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