Avoiding Treatment Failures in Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Chapter
Part of the Series in Anxiety and Related Disorders book series (SARD)

Abstract

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) first appeared as a diagnosis in the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III; American Psychiatric Association (APA), 1980). Since that time, programmatic research on the nature of worry and GAD has led to advancements both in its diagnostic criteria and in its treatment. With the publication of DSM-III-R (APA, 1987), the primary defining symptom of GAD became excessive anxiety and worry about more than one topic. Later, DSM-IV (APA, 1994) retained excessive worry as GAD’s cardinal feature and further stipulated that the worry must be difficult to control.

Keywords

Depression Posit Carmin Hate Alexithymia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of IllinoisChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Penn State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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