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Assessment of Social Skills and Social Competence in Learners with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Peter F. Gerhardt
  • Erik Mayville
Chapter
Part of the ABCT Clinical Assessment Series book series (ABCT)

Abstract

In practical terms, autism, or as it is generally referred to today, autism spectrum disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder impacting communicative and social competence and characterized by restricted patterns of behavior, interests or activities, and stereotypic behavior (e.g., Volkmar & Klin, 2005). The term autism spectrum disorder is used to describe the wide diversity of expression within this diagnostic category and is generally acknowledged to include the separate diagnoses of autism, Asperger Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS).

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Social Skill Social Competence Asperger Syndrome Joint Attention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter F. Gerhardt
    • 1
  • Erik Mayville
    • 2
  1. 1.Organization for Autism ResearchArlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Connecticut Center for Child Development and Institution for Educational PlanningMilfordUSA

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