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I-LEARN and the Assessment of Learning with Information

  • Delia Neuman
Chapter

Abstract

Assessment is a staple of formal learning environments and a useful concept for monitoring learning in informal information-rich environments as well. This chapter surveys the recent history of the assessment movement and positions the I-LEARN model as a framework that is especially well suited to a contemporary assessment of learning with information. The model is consistent with both traditional and current approaches to assessment, its structure lends itself to the design of assessment instruments, and it addresses current and emerging thinking about using information as a tool for learning. Above all, it provides a mechanism for linking learning and assessment in a holistic, authentic, and satisfying experience. Different in tone and structure from the preceding chapters, this final chapter draws together and expands ideas introduced throughout the book. It closes the loop about learning in information-rich environments with a discussion of how I-LEARN can promote and assess such learning not only in today’s information-rich environments but in those of the future as well.

Keywords

Information Literacy Summative Assessment School Librarian Common Core State Standard 21st Century Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Information Science and TechnologyDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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