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Today’s Learners and Learning with Information

  • Delia Neuman
Chapter

Abstract

Contemporary information-rich environments, especially the Internet  /  Web, have changed the way we look at learning. While learning itself remains the same—the construction of personal meaning from interactions with information—the routes to learning have expanded and diversified. So, too, have the challenges. This chapter paints a picture of today’s learners-with-information and delineates the concepts, strategies, and skills that all of us, as learners, need to master to make the most of the learning opportunities that surround us. It surveys relevant research and theory from information studies and instructional design and development to suggest how collaborative research and development across these fields can lead to improved environments for both informational and instructional uses. Drawing on the rich traditions from both fields and on current initiatives that highlight the importance of using information as a tool for learning, the chapter interweaves key traditional and contemporary ideas to offer a slate of possible theoretical frameworks for guiding research in several important areas related to learning in today’s information-rich environments.

Keywords

Instructional Design Information Study Information Literacy School Library Educational Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Information Science and TechnologyDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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