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Pre-Columbian Foodways in Mesoamerica

  • John E. Staller
  • Michael D. Carrasco
Chapter

Abstract

This collaboration originates from our mutual participation in an invited session “The Role of Sustenance in the Feasts, Festivals, Rituals and Every Day Life of Mesoamerica” organized by Karen Bassie at the 40th Annual Chacmool Conference. Eat, Drink, and Be Merry: The Archaeology of Foodways. Hosted by the Chacmool Archaeological Association and the University of Calgary, Department of Archaeology, November 10–12, 2007 Calgary, Alberta. We are sincerely grateful to Karen Bassie for her encouragement in stimulating this collaboration and her ­support of this project.

Keywords

Food Crop Ethnic Identity Brocket Deer Maya Area Ancient Pottery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We wish to express our sincere appreciation to Brian Stross (University of Texas-Austin) and David A. Freidel (Washington University in St. Louis) for their insightful comments on this chapter. We also thank Karen Bassie (University of Calgary) for inspiring this volume through our mutual participation at a session of on Mesoamerican foodways in Alberta, Canada

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Field MuseumChicagoUSA

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