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Return to Work After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Supported Employment Approach

  • Pamela Targett
  • Paul Wehman
Chapter

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most prevalent disabilities in the United States. Of the estimated 1.4 million who sustain a TBI annually, about 1.1 million are treated and released from the emergency room (Langlois et al. 2006). Another 235,000 are hospitalized, and 80,000 to 90,000 experience permanent disabilities (Langlois et al. 2006) TBI is three times more common in men than in women, with the most common causes for injury being motor vehicle accidents, falls, and violence (Greenwald et al. 2003).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Vocational Rehabilitation Employment Specialist Situational Assessment Workplace Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.VCU RRTC, Virginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA

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