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Control of Terror—Terror of Control

  • Jitka Malečková
Chapter

Abstract

The terrorism of recent decades, characterized by a new breed of terrorist and a new type of terrorist organization that uses new methods and weapons, is considered to be substantially different and more dangerous than terrorism of the past. This chapter asks whether terrorism today is less foreseeable and controllable than it used to be. It puts the “new terrorism” in a historical perspective, focusing on the characteristics of individual terrorists, the goals of terrorist organizations, the predictability and control of terrorist events, and the perceptions of and responses to the terrorist threat. An overview of relevant literature and empirical data suggests that, although terrorism keeps changing, current terrorism is not a complete break from the past and our control is not decreasing.

Keywords

Terrorist Attack Civil Liberty Terrorist Group Terrorist Threat Terrorist Incident 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Middle Eastern and African Studies, Charles UniversityPragueCzech Republic

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